I encourage you to take some time to become familiar with our services and the resources that are available to you in our website. You can learn more about (a) the sport psychology services that we can provide to athletes, coaches, teams, and other performers, (b) the sport psychology educational opportunities that are available through UNT, (c) our ongoing sport psychology research projects at the university and in the community, and (d) the sport psychology resources that we have developed for athletes, coaches, teams, and parents, and made available to you in this site. If you have any questions about our work, please feel free to contact us via email ([email protected]) or phone 940-369-SPORT (7767). 
The program includes classes in the areas of Assessment and Interviewing, Transitional Coaching (focusing on leaders who are attempting to adapt to new work environments), Developmental Coaching focusing on accelerating the development of high-potential leaders), and Performance Coaching (focusing on leaders who are attempting to overcome performance issues)
Upon receiving your graduate degree, you will see there are a lot of options for you as far as jobs. These include being a faculty member at university where you would teach and conduct research. You could work at a hospital, physical rehabilitation center, or gym. There are job possibilities with the military, given their concern with keeping troops mentally fit for battle. Finally, you might decide to open your own practice, where you can work with individual athletes and/or teams. Your private practice might even lead to working with individuals you might not typically think of as athletes. This could include dancers, or even those in the business world who may be dealing with high-pressure jobs. As far as what you will earn in a job, collegeatlas.com lists the mean salary for a sports psychologist at $57,000. However, I have seen higher estimates when reading various Internet sites about sports psychology.
It is used for a wide variety of applications, and studies into its efficacy are often of poor quality[2] which makes it difficult to determine efficacy. Several recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the literature on various conditions have concluded that the efficacy of hypnotherapy is "not verified",[3] that there is no evidence[4][5] or insufficient evidence[6][7] for efficacy.
Hypnotherapy is guided hypnosis, or a trance-like state of focus and concentration achieved with the help of a clinical hypnotherapist. This trance-like state is similar to being completely absorbed in a book, movie, music, or even one's own thoughts or meditations. In this state, clients can turn their attention completely inward to find and utilize the natural resources deep within themselves that can help them make changes or regain control in certain areas of their life.
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